The Apollo program of putting people on the moon is the result of the efforts and silent sacrifices of hundreds of thousands of people.

July 20, 1969 marked in the history of mankind when the Apollo 11 landed on the Moon. For Neil Armstrong to place the American flag on the surface of the Moon, making the first footprint on it, a well-researched plan, operated by thousands of people. This special program also has many memorable numbers.

Neil Armstrong planted an American flag on the surface of the Moon. (Photo: NASA).

400,000 people support one person
Neil Armstrong is one of NASA’s outstanding pilots. When he landed on the lunar surface on July 20, 1969, the first successful or failed landing all depended on the man’s skill, reaction ability and proficiency. With the gravel fields ahead, the alarm ringing and the fuel running out, Armstrong drove the spacecraft to the ground.

But in a number of conversations and interviews about the landing, Armstrong has always been modest when it comes to this historic achievement. Instead, he emphasized that hundreds of thousands of people contributed to the success of the program.

NASA estimates that a total of 400,000 men and women across the US participate in the Apollo program, from astronauts, flight control specialists, contractors to food suppliers, engineers, and scientists. learn, doctor, nurse, mathematician and programmer.

Flight control specialists follow the journey of Apollo 11.

Viewed from Apollo 11 flight – a flight to help people land on the Moon. Not only did Armstrong receive Buzz Aldrin’s support aboard the ship, there was also a room filled with flight control specialists. In each shift, in addition to the core team of about 20-30 people, there are hundreds of engineers in Houston and experts at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston are on call for advice whenever the computer issues an alarm.

The flight control center is supported by ground communication stations around the world, a team of engineers who make the landing craft at Grumman Group and all subcontractors. Besides, there is a support team from senior managers to coffee sellers, the number has reached thousands. Multiply that number by every other part of the project (rocket, astronaut suit, communications, fuel, design, training, from launching to returning to Earth …). 400,000 people still seem modest. All of these have supported the single man’s action.

Average age of Apollo astronauts: 38
Armstrong was not a specially selected pilot for his first moon landing, his crew was the next option in the rotation. If the Apollo 11 can not land, it is likely that Pete Conrad, commander of the Apollo 12, will be the first man to land on the Moon. In fact, despite representing the entire human race, the Apollo astronauts have the same age, biography, competence, and training.

“In my opinion it is important that we remember how unique and carefully selected the Apollo project team is,” said Teasel Muir-Harmony, who is in charge of displaying the Apollo spacecraft in Bao. Smithsonian National Aerospace Museum in Washington DC, shared. Each member of the Apollo 11 crew was born in 1930, they used to be in the army, were pilots.

At that time Armstrong was 38, the youngest co-commander on the Apollo ship (along with Tom Stafford and Gene Cernan). Charlie Duke, the 36-year-old pilot of the Apollo 16 landing craft, is the youngest man to land on the Moon. The oldest person to walk on the Moon was astronaut Alan Shepard, flying aboard Apollo 14 in 1971. Shepard was 47 years old.

12 astronauts once set foot and drove on the Moon

There are 33 astronauts on flights during the Apollo Moon landing program. Among them, 27 people fly to the Moon, 24 people orbit the Moon but only 12 people set foot on the surface. They represent “humanity” and face the challenge of transmitting that experience to a global audience.

8 NASA astronauts died during the Apollo program
Before the first three crew of the Apollo 7 mission departed in October 1968, eight astronauts on the Apollo program were killed. The first man who died in 1964 was Theodore Freeman when his plane, the T-38 trainer, hit a bird, broke the cockpit cover and the engine stopped working. Despite his escape, Freeman was too close to the ground and died due to the impact.

On February 28, 1966, the main crew for the mission Gemini 9, Elliot See and Charles Bassett prepared to land the T-38 aircraft on St Louis. Due to cloudiness obscuring the runway, See misplaced a turn and crashed into the building where their spacecraft was being built. Two pilots were killed instantly.

In 1967, NASA prepared to launch the first Apollo. But the spacecraft is constantly broken and commander Gus Grissom knows it. In an uncomfortable mood, he hung a lemon outside the Apollo ship simulator in Cape Canaveral base.

On January 27, 1967, the crew, including Grissom, Ed White (the first American to walk in space) and Roger Chaffee, lay in the seats on the launch pad to test the entire spacecraft. The test has failed. Within seconds, flames burned up the crew.

Later that year, Clifton Williams died in another T-38 crash and Edward Givens died in a traffic accident. All eight astronauts and six Soviet astronauts were commemorated with a stele left by the Apollo 15 crew on the Moon.

Only one woman was present in the control room of the Apollo 11 launch
The equipment control specialist, JoAnn Morgan, is the only woman in the control room of the Apollo 11 launch at Cape Canaveral base. As an engineer, a 21-channel guest lady as well as the stability of all Saturn missile tracking systems 5. “Launching is a controlled explosion. You are always a little scared but you still have to watch it, “Morgan said.

As one of the few women in senior positions, Morgan regularly faced gender discrimination, especially when she started the job. “I received obscene calls, some rude comments in the elevator and the touches in the dining area. After a while, most of those actions were gone because people realized I worked really hard. serious, “recounted Morgan.