Poaching is a prohibited practice in many countries around the world, as a final effort to protect wildlife from extinction from human greed. But in reality, stopping poachers doesn’t always succeed.

For example, recently, a very horrific picture taken in North Botswana (Africa) shows how failed we are to prevent poaching of rare animals. It is the scene of an African elephant’s body being brutally slaughtered, in order to take away the whole head and the ivory cluster – its most valuable items on the black market.

This photo was taken by photographer Justin Sullivan, residing in Cape Town, South Africa. According to the report, poachers used a chainsaw to cut off the trunk and take away the ivory. The whole body was left there, in the middle of the barren savannah.

Sullivan said he was working on a film for a private company in Botswana, when he suddenly heard the rangers say something about an elephant poaching.

“They said the elephant was attacked, and I immediately asked to go to the scene. When I arrived, I used the drone and obtained this heartbreaking photo,” said the 28-year-old photographer.

“The picture is called” Disconnection “- and it shows an angle you can’t tell when you’re just standing on the ground. Thanks to the drone, the picture highlights the separation between the two parts of the elephant, and also to show that we were too indifferent to this story. “

Notably, Sullivan’s photo appeared just a month after the ban on hunting in Botswana was lifted.

“I’m glad the photo got a lot of attention. Confused emotions happened: anger, grief, mostly for a new hunting ban was lifted in Botswana. But on the other hand, this photo brings the message that we need to build a more sustainable elephant sanctuary, and address the crisis that is currently happening with the ecosystem. “

Sullivan’s photo is very emotional, and was honored to choose to participate in the international press photography Andrei Stenin International. The contest results will be announced at the end of 2019.

In fact, even when the ban was still in place, forest rangers’ statistics showed that poaching on the elephant in Botswana was no better. In the 2017-2018 period alone, about 400 elephants were killed. And in the 2014-2018 period, the number of poached elephants increased to 593%.

According to a new study published in the journal Current Biology, the pressure on conservationists in Botswana will increase after the ban is lifted. “There is evidence that ivory poaching has been taking place at a rate of several hundred each year before 2017. And now the ban has been lifted.” – extracting research reports.