Imagine you are listening to someone chewing on a piece of chewing gum and feel that sound is really disgusting and makes you angry, panicked. Of course it’s not a disease but a rare syndrome called Misophonia.

We can get used to annoying sounds like the chewing of something topping up, but for people with Misophonia, it’s a pain.

According to Odditycentral, Misophonia is also known as Selective Sound Sensitivity Syndrome. This syndrome is described as the strong emotional or physiological reaction of a person when hearing unpleasant sounds, often man-made like the sound emitted when someone bites a crunchy dish, sounds Clicks by mouse or keyboard, knocking on the door or even breathing make people suffer from Misophonia syndrome.

Anger is a common reaction of people with this syndrome. However, other reactions such as anxiety or disgust may also occur. These negative emotions are often associated with the release of adrenaline. This hormone can cause dangerous symptoms such as increased heart rate, tremor, and sweating. This makes people suffering from Misophonia always have to listen to these very familiar sounds.

People suffering from misophonia syndrome suffer from “allergy” to many familiar sounds in life

Margot Noel, 28, a person with UK misophonia, recently shared something about what she went through when she had the syndrome. Noel says she feels allergic to sounds like eating crispy foods, whispers, clicking her tongue, pressing a ballpoint pen and breaking her knuckles. Not because she didn’t like the sounds, but because she couldn’t stand the unpleasant sounds that rang in her ears.

Noel said: “That sound made me jump out of my chair and I would have to do something to stop it. It sounded like the crack of the knuckles was not a sound I didn’t like. It was better. And yet, because it was really different, when I heard that sound, I always felt extremely nervous, or suddenly I felt overwhelmed and could not think of anything else. on my side, maybe I will have the same feeling. “

Margot Noel has had to deal with this syndrome since she was a child. At that time, the younger brother knew that his sister could not handle the sounds, so she continued to click her tongue when dealing with her sister.

The sound of a straw will also make people with misophonia feel uncomfortable

The click of the pen is the same

Cracking the bags completely can cause anxiety for people with misophonia

Keyboard clicking sound

And the sound of you eating crunchy dishes is also very dangerous for people with misophonia

She once shared with friends and relatives about the syndrome and told them that it was not their fault. Noel said, she did not want to because of her problems that make it difficult for everyone.

Noel knew about the syndrome she had 3 years ago after watching a play. While enjoying the play, she suddenly heard someone’s breathing as if dying. It caused her to lose focus on the play. When she returned home, she studied the documents about the syndrome she had to learn about her condition.

After learning that she had Misophonia, Noel contacted one of the scientists who studied the syndrome and was able to undergo a 6-stage test to measure her reaction to sound. Unfortunately, Noel only passed 2/6 tests before everything became too limited.

Every day, Noel often has to wear earplugs or headphones to block out the street sounds that can make her feel crazy. When watching movies, she must cover her ears whenever she hears the sounds or whispers in the film. Even when he enters the cinema, Noel often asks people in front of him to avoid the effects of Misophonia.

Or as the case of high school girl Ellie Rapp, living in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. She also suffers from this syndrome and always feels heart palpitations, irritability or crying when hearing unpleasant sounds. Rapp even said that the sound could even kill her.

Rapp said she has experienced this feeling since she was a toddler. When her mother came home from preschool, her mother turned on the radio and sang when Rapp suddenly screamed and cried. All of Rapp’s friends and relatives are quite confused when facing Rapp because they do not know when it will make her feel uncomfortable with their daily familiar noises.

Unfortunately, so far there is no cure for this syndrome.